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  1. Free Lesson Plan Samples
  2. Rhetorical Situation
  3. Claims and Evidence
  4. Reasoning and Organization
  5. Style
  6. Multiple-Choice Questions
  7. Synthesis
  8. Rhetorical Analysis
  9. Argument
  10. Additional Resources

Free Lesson Plan Samples

Eliminating the Distractor

Evaluating Commentary

Sojourner Truth’s “Ain’t I a Woman?”

Turning the Argument into Synthesis

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Rhetorical Situation

Analyzing Bronson’s Speech to the President

Analyzing “Desiree’s Baby”

Analyzing Faulkner’s Nobel Acceptance Speech

Analyzing Rhetoric of Your Choice

Analyzing Rhetorical Appeals

Analyzing the Rhetorical Situation: President Bush’s 9-11 Speech

Authentic Interpretation of Douglass’s Oration

Benjamin Banneker’s “Letter to Jefferson”

Demonstrating an Understanding of the Audience

Demonstrating an Understanding of the Audience’s Beliefs, Values, or Needs

Identifying Audiences Beliefs, Values, and Needs in Advertisements

Identifying the Rhetorical Situation 2020

Identifying the Rhetorical Situation 2021

Identifying the Rhetorical Situation 2022

Rhetorical Situation: Sojourner Truth

Tone and the Rhetorical Situation

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Claims and Evidence

Analyzing the Evidence: Alfred Green Speech

Developing a Claim

Explaining How Claims are Qualified

Identifying and Analyzing Claims

Identifying and Analyzing Claims 2021

Identifying and Making Claims

Identifying Claims and Evidence in an Argument

Identifying Claims and Evidence in an Argument 2021-22

Qualifying a Claim

Qualifying a Claim 2021-22

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Reasoning and Organization

Analyzing Purpose, Audience, and Message and Practicing Line of Reasoning with “The Space Shuttle Challenger Tragedy Address” by Ronald Reagan

Developing a Line of Reasoning

Emulating Line of Reasoning

Identifying the Line of Reasoning 2020

Identifying the Line of Reasoning 2022

Recognizing and Explaining Methods of Development

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Style

Developing a Paragraph

Emulating Style: “The Hill We Climb”

Explaining How Word Choice, Comparisons, & Syntax Contribute to Tone

Figurative Language in Rhetoric

Sentence Structure as Rhetoric

Using Appropriate Methods to Advance an Argument

Using Conventions to Communicate Effectively

Using Transitional Elements to Move Through the Line of Reasoning

Writing and Evaluating Thesis Statements

Writing Appropriate Introductions

Writing For Sophistication: President Bush’s 9-11 Speech

Writing Sophisticated Thesis Statements

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Multiple-Choice Questions

Analyzing Answer Choices

Creating Multiple-Choice Answers

Creating Multiple-Choice Answers for a Writing Passage

Creating Multiple-Choice Questions 2020

Creating Multiple-Choice Reading Questions

Creating Short-Answer Responses

Eliminating the Distractor

Multiple-Choice Practice: Short Answers

Multiple-Choice Reading Questions

Multiple-Choice Short Answers

Reflecting on the Multiple-Choice Exam

Reflecting on the Multiple-Choice Exam 2019

Writing Questions

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Synthesis

Developing a Line of Reasoning for the Synthesis Essay

Effectively Synthesizing Sources

Evaluating a Synthesis Essay

Evaluating Sources in the Synthesis Essay

Evaluating Sources in the Synthesis Prompt

Student Synthesis Project

Synthesizing with a Theme

The Argument or Synthesis Essay

The Synthesis Prompt Practice

Turning the Argument into Synthesis

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Rhetorical Analysis

Analyzing Imagery through The Scarlet Letter

Analyzing the Rhetorical Analysis

Embedding Evidence

Evaluating Commentary

Frederick Douglass’s Oration at The Emancipation Memorial

Identifying Purpose in Washington’s Farewell Address

Rhetorical Analysis One-Pager

Self-Editing the Rhetorical Analysis

The Thesis Point: Alfred Green’s Speech

Understanding the Audience’s Beliefs, Values, or Needs

Using the Annotation Chart: Alfred Green’s Speech

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Argument

Acquiring Evidence for an Argument

Building a Bank of Knowledge

Creating a Group Argument Essay

Earning the Argument Thesis Point

Evaluating an Argument Essay

Evaluating Evidence and Commentary in the Argument Essay

Explaining How an Argument Reveals an Understanding of the Audience

Peer Revising The Argument Essay

Revising an Argument Essay

The Argument Prompt Practice

The Argument Prompt Practice 2020-21

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Additional Resources

Analyzing Visual Rhetoric

Analyzing Visual Rhetoric 2020-21

Creating a Public Service Announcement

Creating an Editorial

Explaining How Word Choice, Comparisons, and Syntax Contribute to Show Relationship Among Ideas

Identifying and Analyzing the Overarching Thesis

Personal Progress Check Reflection

Preparing for College Applications

Studying Satire

Turning Art into an Argument

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Go to:

  1. Free Lesson Plan Samples
  2. Characterization
  3. Setting
  4. Structure
  5. Narration
  6. Figurative Language
  7. Multiple-Choice Questions
  8. Poetry Analysis
  9. Prose Analysis
  10. Literary Argument
  11. Additional Resources

Free Lesson Plan Samples

Analyzing Characterization

Analyzing Setting

Choosing Evidence and Outlining with Poetry

Figurative Language in Poetry

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Characterization

Analyzing Characterization

Analyzing Characterization 2020-21

Analyzing Characterization SWS 2021

Analyzing Character’s Perspectives

Analyzing Contrasting Characters

Character Analysis: Dissecting the Characterization within the short story The Night Came Slowly by Kate Chopin

Characterization with Short Fiction

Comparing Character Perspectives Dec 2021-22

Comparing Character Perspectives March 2021-22

Comparing Character Perspectives Nov 2021-22

Complexities in Character Relationships in Hands

Examining Characterization in Metamorphosis

Function and Complexity of Characters

Incorporating Characterization to Answer Question 3 on the AP® Literature Exam

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Setting

Analyzing Setting

Analyzing Setting SWS 2021

Analyzing Setting in Short Fiction

The Function of Setting in A Carnival Jungle

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Structure

Analysis of Narrative Structure with “My Last Duchess”

Analyzing Plot Events in Short Film

Analyzing Plot Structure in a Text

Analyzing Poetic Structure

Analyzing Point of View in Short Fiction

Function and Conflict in a Text

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Narration

Analysis for the Function of Narrator

Analyzing and Evaluating the Credibility of Narrators in a Question 3 Essay

Analyzing the Credibility of Narrators

Exam Review: Unreliable Narrators in Literary Argumentation

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Figurative Language

Analyzing Personification and Practicing Line of Reasoning with Poetry: “Christmas Trees” by Robert Frost

Comparative Writing: Analyzing Tone in Longer Fiction

Figurative Language in Poetry

Function of a Symbol in an Excerpt from The Sport of the Gods

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Multiple-Choice Questions

Creating Multiple-Choice Answer Choices with an Excerpt from “The Mayor of Casterbridge”

Eliminating the Distractor

Multiple-Choice Practice: Drama

Multiple-Choice Practice: Drama with Macbeth

Multiple Choice Practice: Poetry

Poetry—Full-Length Multiple-Choice Practice

Poetry Multiple-Choice Practice

Poetry Multiple-Choice Practice 2

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Poetry Analysis

Analyzing the Function of Contrast in Poetry: My Childhood Home I See Again by Abraham Lincoln

Analyzing the Poetry Analysis Essay

Analyzing the Poetry Analysis Essay SWS 2021

Analyzing Tone in Poetry 2020-21

Choosing Evidence and Outlining with Poetry

Comparative Analysis Analyzing tone in Poetic Works

Practice with Question 1 Thesis Statements

“Reflections” by Ann Plato

Reviewing the Poetry Essay

Sonnet Activity: Identifying and Defining Shifts

“The Hill We Climb” by Amanda Gorman

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Prose Analysis

Analyzing the Prose Analysis Essay

Analyzing the Prose Analysis Essay 2020-21

Analyzing the Prose Analysis Essay SWS 2021

Embedding Evidence

Essay Self-Review and Peer-Review

Exam Review: Prose Analysis Essay Critique

Reviewing the Prose Essay

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Literary Argument

3-2-1 Literary Argument Essay Activity

Analyzing Archetypes: Preparing for Literary Argument

Developing a Line of Reasoning

Literary Argument Essay: Prompt Analysis and Thesis Writing

Peer Revising The Argument Essay

Preparing for Question 3

Preparing for the Literary Analysis Essay

Question 3 Peer Editing

Reviewing the Literary Argument Essay

The Literary Argument Essay SWS 2021

Thesis Writing with the Literary Argument Essay

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Additional Resources

Creative Ode Writing

Hexagonal Thinking and H.G. Wells

Previewing the AP® English Literature and Composition Exam

Revising Timed Essays for Use of Transitions

Tic Tac Toe: Finding Connections to Class Novels

Using Creative Writing to Teach Gothic Elements

Utilizing Literary Devices in College Essays

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Here’s a sample of our English Language lesson plans.

Unit 1
Unit 1: RHS 1.A: Introducing the Rhetorical Situation
Unit 1: CLE 3.A: Identifying Claims and Evidence
Unit 1: CLE 4.A: Creating a Claim with Evidence
Unit 2
Unit 2: RHS 1.B: Explaining How an Argument Demonstrates an Understanding of the Audience
Unit 2: RHS 2.B: Demonstrating an Understanding of the Audience
Unit 2: CLE 4.B: Writing Thesis Statements that Require Proof
Unit 3
Unit 3: REO 5.A: Describing and Evaluating a Line of Reasoning
Unit 3: REO 5.C: Recognizing and Explaining the Use of Methods of Development
Unit 3: REO 6.A: Developing a Line of Reasoning
Unit 4
Unit 4: CLE 3.B: Identifying and Describing an Overarching Thesis
Unit 4: RHS 2.A: Writing Introductions and Conclusions Appropriate to the Rhetorical Situation
Unit 4: REO 6.C: Using Appropriate Methods to Advance an Argument
Unit 5
Unit 5: REO 5.B: Explain How Organization of a Text Creates Unity and Reflects a Line of Reasoning
Unit 5: REO 6.A: Developing a Line of Reasoning Supported with Commentary
Unit 5: REO 6.A: Developing a Line of Reasoning
Unit 5: 6.B: Using Transitional Elements to Move Through the Line of Reasoning
Unit 6
Unit 6: CLE 3.A: Identifying and Explaining Claims and Evidence within an Argument
Unit 6: STL 7.A: Explaining How Word Choice, Comparisons, and Syntax Contribute to Tone
Unit 6: CLE 4.A: Developing a Paragraph that Includes a Claim with Evidence
Unit 7
Unit 7: CLE 3.C: Explaining How Claims are Qualified
Unit 7: STL 7.B: Explaining How Writers Create Independent Clauses to Show Relationships Among Ideas
Unit 7: CLE 4.C: Qualifying a Claim
Unit 7: STL 8.C: Using Established Conventions to Communicate Effectively
Unit 8
Unit 8: RHS 1.B: Explaining How an Argument Demonstrates an Understanding of an Audience
Unit 8: RHS 2.B: Demonstrating an Understanding of an Audience
Unit 9
Unit 9: CLE 3.C: Explaining How Claims are Qualified
Unit 9: CLE 4.C: Qualifying a Claim
Review
Unit 1: RHS 1.A: Review: Identifying and Describing the Rhetorical Situation
Unit 2: CLE 4.B: Review: Writing Thesis Statements that Require Defense
Unit 5: REO 5.A: Review: Describing the Line of Reasoning

Here’s a sample of our English Literature lesson plans.

Unit 1
Unit 1: NAR 4.B: Analyzing Point of View in Short Fiction
Unit 1: STR 3.A: Analyzing Plot Events in Short Film
Previewing the AP English Literature and Composition Exam
Unit 2
Unit 2: STR 3.C: Explaining the Function of Structure in a Text
Unit 2: FIG 6.A and 6.B: Identifying and Explaining the Function of a Simile and a Metaphor
Unit 2: LAN 7.A: Developing a Paragraph that Includes a Claim that Requires Defense with Evidence from the Text and the Evidence Itself
Unit 3
Unit 3: CHR 1.A: Identifying and Describing what Specific Textual Details Reveal about a Character, that Character’s Perspective, and that Character’s Motives
Unit 3: STR 3.E: Explaining the Function of a Significant Event or Related Set of Significant Events in a Plot
Unit 3: LAN 7.B: Developing a Thesis Statement that Conveys a Defensible Claim about an Interpretation of Literature and that May Establish a Line or Reasoning
Unit 4
Unit 4: CHR 1.C: Explaining the Function of Contrasting Characters
Unit 4: NAR 4.C and LAN 7.C: Identifying and Describing Details, Diction, or Syntax in a Text that Reveal a Narrator’s or Speaker’s Perspective, and Developing a Commentary that Establishes and Explains Relationships among Textual Evidence, the Line of Reasoning, and the Thesis
Unit 4: LAN 7.D: Selecting and Using Relevant and Sufficient Evidence to Both Develop and Support a Line of Reasoning
Unit 5
Unit 5: FIG 5.B: Explaining the Function of Specific Words and Phrases in a Text
Unit 5: LAN 7.E: Demonstrating Control over the Elements of Composition to Communicate Clearly
Practice: Multiple-Choice Questions
Unit 6
Unit 6: NAR 4.D: Explaining how a Narrator’s Reliability Affects a Narrative
Unit 6: LAN 7.E: Demonstrate Control over the Elements of Composition to Communicate Clearly
Practicing Peer Review with the Prose Analysis Essay
Unit 7
Unit 7: SET 2.B: Explaining the Function of Setting in a Narrative
Unit 7: CHR 1.D: Describing how Textual Details Reveal Nuances and Complexities in Characters’ Relationships with One Another
Unit 7: FIG 5.C: Identifying and Explaining the Function of a Symbol
Unit 8
Unit 8: STR 3.D: Explaining the Function of Contrasts within a Text
Unit 8: FIG 6.B: Identifying and Explaining the Function of a Metaphor
Unit 8: LAN 7.C: Developing a Commentary that Establishes and Explains Relationships among Textual Evidence, the Line of Reasoning, and the Thesis
Unit 9
Unit 9: CHR 1.B and CHR 1.E: Explaining the Function of a Character Changing or Remaining Unchanged, and Explaining how a Character’s own Choices, Actions, and Speech Reveal Complexities in that Character, and Explaining the Function of Those Complexities
Unit 9: STR 3.F: Explaining the Function of Conflict in a Text
Unit 9: LAN 7.D: Selecting and Using Relevant and Sufficient Evidence to Both Develop and Support a Line of Reasoning
Review
Test Preparation: Novels to Read before the AP English Literature and Composition Exam
Practice: Multiple-Choice Questions